FIVE FACTS about Anton Reicha’s first set of wind quintets

East Windies Quintet (Plus!)

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1.  Opus 88 was published in 1818 by the House of Simrock;  2.  The frontispiece was printed in French, the internal text in Italian:  Quintour vs. Quintetto;  3.  These intitial three wind quintets set out to compete with then-dominant interest in / availability of string (chamber) music;  4.  There was no published score, only the five parts;  5.  The original ensemble, whose members signed the preface were: J Guillou (flute), G Vogt (oboe), J-J Bouffil (clarinet), L-F Dauprat (horn), and M Henry (bassoon).

Joseph Guillou 1787 - 1853

Joseph Guillou (1787-1870) French flautist.
This post based on article by Charles-David Lehrer.  “The Opus 88 wind Quintets of Antoine Reicha.”  http://www.idrs.org.  accessed 5.4.2016; and image search:  “Joseph  Gillou”. http://www.commons.wikimedia.org. accessed 9.4.2016

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Reicha’s Wind Quintet op 91 No 3 in D major

cropped-east-windies-logo-small-jpg3Anton Reicha Anton Reicha (1770- 1836)

Anton Reicha’s 24 wind quintets were composed in Paris between 1811 and 1820.  They were a conscious attempt to fill a void in the repertoire for wind chamber works.  Reicha later wrote  “…there was a dearth not only of good classic music, but of any good music at all for wind instruments….”   In general, the Quintets combined three major elements:  1.  virtuoso display;  2. popular elements (Bohemian folk melodies, marches, etc.); and 3. an academic interest in variation form and counterpoint.

Published by Simrock in 1818-1819.  Opus 91 number 3 (D major) was conceived as a lighthearted composition (with a complicated structure!); highlights from the various movements include:

First movement:  A substantial flute cadenza in the slow introduction (Reicha’s first instrument was the flute); followed by a 6/8 scherzo theme. Overall homophonic tone.  Second movement:  Bel canto feel; operatic ritornello form (2 episodes); Third movement:  Imitative counterpoint in the Trio; Fourth movement:  a rondo with sonata form overlay.

This post is paraphrased from two articles: 1) Anton Reicha, Wikipedia, accessed 19.7.16;  2) Charles-David Lehrer, The Opus 91 wind Quintets of Antoine Reicha; http://www.idrs.org/scores/Lehrer2/Reicha/op91/no3.html

 

 

FIVE FACTS about Anton Reicha’s first set of wind quintets

cropped-east-windies-logo-small-jpg3

1.  Opus 88 was published in 1818 by the House of Simrock;  2.  The frontispiece was printed in French, the internal text in Italian:  Quintour vs. Quintetto;  3.  These intitial three wind quintets set out to compete with then-dominant interest in / availability of string (chamber) music;  4.  There was no published score, only the five parts;  5.  The original ensemble, whose members signed the preface were: J Guillou (flute), G Vogt (oboe), J-J Bouffil (clarinet), L-F Dauprat (horn), and M Henry (bassoon).

Joseph Guillou 1787 - 1853

Joseph Guillou (1787-1870) French flautist.
This post based on article by Charles-David Lehrer.  “The Opus 88 wind Quintets of Antoine Reicha.”  http://www.idrs.org.  accessed 5.4.2016; and image search:  “Joseph  Gillou”. http://www.commons.wikimedia.org. accessed 9.4.2016

 

 

Danzi Quintet opus 56 no. 1

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Franz Danzi, Quintet in B Flat, Op. 56, #1: Mov’t 1: Allegretto played by the Toronto Wind Quintet

Danzi’s first wind quintet from 1821, when he was attempting to storm Paris with the new genre.  He was 58 at the time, and died just five years later.  His wind quintet rival Anton Reicha outlived him by 10 years.

Anton Reicha (1770 – 1836)

cropped-east-windies-logo-small-jpg3.pngAnton ReichaFriend of Beethoven, teacher of Lizst and Berlioz (among others of note), and childhood runaway: Anton Reicha succeeded in the 18th c music world of Vienna and Paris as prolific composer, music-educator and academic scholar.  Most famously, in Paris he consciously strove to establish the new wind quintet genre—to which end he contributed an astonishing 24 Quintets.   More on Reicha in subsequent posts:   we will be following his music (and that of Franz Danzi, a contemporary) over the next few months.
Image Search:  Anton Reicha.  “Anton Reicha:  Biography-Classic Cat”.  http://www.classicat.net. 5.4.2016

 

The Philidor Dynasty

EAST WINDIES LOGO small.jpg  PHILIDOR FRANCOIS ANDRE

                       Francois-Andre Danican Philidor

In the 17th & 18th centuries, the family Philidor served as court musicians and composers to French royalty over several generations. Their original surname, Danican, became Philidor when Louis XIII so-dubbed his oboist Michel Danican, after an Italian virtuoso named “Filidori”.  Michel was Grandad to a number of prominent musicians, among them two Philidors famous for rather divergent interests:  Anne Danican Philidor (1681 – 1728), who started the celebrated concert series Concert Spirituel (he was also an accomplished composer); and Francois-Andre Danican Philidor (1726 – 1795)—the very late younger brother of Anne Danican—who was a celeb chess master, renoun for “the Philidor defence” (opening) and “the Philidor position” (endgame).  Above is a picture of the chess master, Francois-Andre (Image search “Philidor”. Chessmanias.com. 27.3.16).

This post based on “Philidor”. en.wikipedia.org. 30.3.2016.

Start of the Concert Spirituel

EAST WINDIES LOGO small.jpg The famous Opera House of Paris (Academie Royale de Musique) traditionally closed during religious festivals. This offered an opportunity for Anne Danican Philidor (1681 – 1728) to promote a new series of concerts:  the so-called Concert Spirituel.  The opportunity cost M. Philidor 1000 francs per year and a promise to present neither French nor operatic music, compliments of the Opera’s Impresario M.Francine.  Hugely successful between 1725 and 1791, the annual rent rose to 9000 francs by 1755.  The Concert Spiritual provided a huge boon for orchestral and instrumental music in France, as well as vocalists. Interestingly the celebrated older sister of Franz Danzi, Madame Francesca Danzi Lebrun, was among those who sang at the venue.  Next post:  more on the Philidor dynasty of musicians.  Just for now, here’s an image of Anne Danican (“Anne_Danican_Philidor”. En. Wikipedia.org. 27.3.2016)

PHILIDOR ANNE DANICAN

This post based on :  “A Dictionary of Music and Musicians/Concert Spirituel”. en.wikipedia.org. 27.3.2016.

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