FIVE FACTS about Anton Reicha’s first set of wind quintets

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1.  Opus 88 was published in 1818 by the House of Simrock;  2.  The frontispiece was printed in French, the internal text in Italian:  Quintour vs. Quintetto;  3.  These intitial three wind quintets set out to compete with then-dominant interest in / availability of string (chamber) music;  4.  There was no published score, only the five parts;  5.  The original ensemble, whose members signed the preface were: J Guillou (flute), G Vogt (oboe), J-J Bouffil (clarinet), L-F Dauprat (horn), and M Henry (bassoon).

Joseph Guillou 1787 - 1853

Joseph Guillou (1787-1870) French flautist.
This post based on article by Charles-David Lehrer.  “The Opus 88 wind Quintets of Antoine Reicha.”  http://www.idrs.org.  accessed 5.4.2016; and image search:  “Joseph  Gillou”. http://www.commons.wikimedia.org. accessed 9.4.2016

 

 

Danzi Quintet opus 56 no. 1

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Franz Danzi, Quintet in B Flat, Op. 56, #1: Mov’t 1: Allegretto played by the Toronto Wind Quintet

Danzi’s first wind quintet from 1821, when he was attempting to storm Paris with the new genre.  He was 58 at the time, and died just five years later.  His wind quintet rival Anton Reicha outlived him by 10 years.

Anton Reicha (1770 – 1836)

cropped-east-windies-logo-small-jpg3.pngAnton ReichaFriend of Beethoven, teacher of Lizst and Berlioz (among others of note), and childhood runaway: Anton Reicha succeeded in the 18th c music world of Vienna and Paris as prolific composer, music-educator and academic scholar.  Most famously, in Paris he consciously strove to establish the new wind quintet genre—to which end he contributed an astonishing 24 Quintets.   More on Reicha in subsequent posts:   we will be following his music (and that of Franz Danzi, a contemporary) over the next few months.
Image Search:  Anton Reicha.  “Anton Reicha:  Biography-Classic Cat”.  http://www.classicat.net. 5.4.2016